Policy Change to Overcome Disparities in Kidney Transplantation

Rachyl Pines Transplant News

By Alice Yang, Intern Implementing policy changes to improve access to kidney transplants and overcome disparities is an important first step in reaching these goals, but it is not enough. Three major policy changes have aimed at improving end-stage kidney disease outcomes and increasing access to transplants. These include the kidney allocation system (KAS) in 2014, the Advancing American Kidney Health Initiative in 2019, and finally, new changes implemented by the Centers for Medicare and …

The Importance of Tailored Education to Address Transplant Disparities

Rachyl Pines Transplant News

By Annika Pearson, Guest TREC Communication Writer A recent study titled, “Ethnic background is associated with no live kidney donor identified at the time of first transplant assessment—an opportunity missed? A single-center retrospective cohort study”, suggests that people from different minority ethnicity groups are not given the same amount or quality of information about their options for managing chronic kidney disease or for renal replacement therapies like transplantation, as others. Research has shown that patients …

A Recent TREC Publication on the Power of a Digital Library of Living Donor Stories

Rachyl Pines New Publications, Transplant News

By Erica Ho, Research Associate There are over 740,000 people in the United States living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD)1,2, but only around 6500 transplants are performed every year due to a severe shortage in available kidneys2. Problems like limited kidney transplant education and medical mistrust make it difficult for enough donors and recipients to be matched3,4. Storytelling has been proven to be an effective strategy in increasing education and awareness for other health issues …

Surveying Spanish-Speaking Kidney Patients

Rachyl Pines Donation Stories, Transplant News

By Yaquelin Arevalo Iraheta, Junior Research Associate. Using an interpreter is worse than having both the patient and provider speak the same language because it loses the personal and intimate element between both parties. Breaking the language barrier that Spanish-speaking patients face when receiving healthcare can also help them overcome cultural barriers such as mistrust of their provider. One of the research projects going on at the Transplant Research and Education Center (TREC) involves surveying …

Announcing the launch of the Listening & Resource Center (KTLRC) & bilingual educational guide

Rachyl Pines COVID-19, Transplant News

By Emily H. Wood, Research Associate The Transplant Research and Education Center (TREC), has launched the COVID-19 Kidney / Transplant Listening & Resource Center (KTLRC). The KTLRC is a toll-free call center that allows patients, their loved ones, and caregivers to connect with our experienced staff to share their questions, concerns, and receive answers, education, and referrals for additional resources. The KTLRC can be reached at: 1-800-830-0484 trec@mednet.ucla.edu We created the KTLRC in direct response …

Real patient stories inspire and educate

Amanda Lipsey Donation Stories, From the Founder, Transplant News

Some of our earliest memories are of hearing stories read to us by our parents – fairy tales, fables, adventures, and epic journeys. Storytelling is an innate and universal part of the human experience. Stories help us make sense of our lives, mark important occasions, and share and connect with the people who matter to us. From founding myths like the tale of Romulus and Remus to true accounts of heroism, or even casual stories …

Eldonna Edwards: living kidney donor

Karen Handelman Donation Stories

Eldonna donated to a stranger, but she gained a dear friend San Luis Obispo, CA — When Eldonna Edwards went back to college at age 48, she never expected that the biggest lesson would be one that can’t be learned in a classroom. A chance meeting with a young woman with kidney disease ended up setting Eldonna on a path she never planned to take. Upon learning of her classmate’s probable fate, Eldonna offered to …

Karen Willis: living kidney donor

Karen Handelman Donation Stories

Karen’s story was featured in the documentary The Chain. Ventura, CA – “Many years ago, my husband and I were talking about doing a good deed for someone else,” recalled Karen Willis. “We wanted to help a complete stranger in a big, life-changing way.” Years later, Karen, 48, and her husband Joshua decided on a health-related good deed, and from there the idea of donating a kidney came very quickly. Many people in need of a …

Jessica Conklin: living kidney donor

Karen Handelman Donation Stories

Sacramento, CA — Jessica Conklin spent many years watching her mother suffer from chronic kidney disease. When she was 20, she tried donating her kidney but found she was not a match. “This devastating news made me feel hopeless as my mom grew weaker,” she recalled. By chance, a nurse mentioned the paired exchange program to Jessica after hearing of her inability to donate directly. She referred Jessica to the UC Davis Paired Exchange program which would …

Phillip Palmer: my decision to donate

Amy D. Waterman, PhD Donation Stories

Phillip Palmer, morning anchor for ABC7 in Los Angeles, was inspired to donate a kidney after reading a Sports Illustrated article about then-NBA star and transplant recipient Alonzo Mourning. He resolved then to one day save someone’s life as a living kidney donor. Years later, that person turned out to be longtime friend Dale Davis. Phillip reflects on his living donation journey. Oddly enough, I learned most everything I know about living donation as I …